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AUDITION GUIDE

OVERVIEW

Auditions can be intimidating, but all-in-all they are simple. Just come prepared with a monologue and/or song, and perform them. If this is your first audition, this guide will hopefully answer any questions you may have about the process. If you are an experienced auditioner, this guide may simply provide a few helpful links or tips. Reading this entire guide is in no way a requirement – feel free to bounce around and use anything that is helpful.

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AUDITION BASICS

Audition Basics

WHAT IS AN AUDITION?

An audition is a sample performance by an actor, singer, musician, dancer or other performer. It typically involves the performer displaying their talent through a previously memorized and rehearsed solo piece or by performing a work or piece given to the performer at the audition or shortly before. Actors may be asked to present a monologue. Singers will perform a song. In an audition, the casting director is testing the ability of the performer to meet the needs of the job and assess how well the individual will take directions and deal with changes. In some auditions, after the performer has demonstrated their abilities in a given performance style, the audition panel may ask a few questions.


WHAT IS A MONOLOGUE?

In theatre, a monologue is a speech presented by a single character, most often to express their thoughts aloud, though sometimes also to directly address another character or the audience. Monologues are common across the range of dramatic media (plays, films, etc.), as well as in non-dramatic media such as poetry.
 

WHERE CAN I FIND A MONOLOGUE?

  • Plays/Musicals

  • Movies/TV Shows (we do not recommend this, but if it is the best thing you can find that fits the character you want it is OK!)


WHAT SHOULD I WEAR TO AN AUDITION?
 


WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT AT A TURPIN THEATRE AUDITION?

  • When it’s time for your audition, you will go on the stage. In the audience will be the directors (and no one else; the other auditionees will not be in the auditorium).

  • You will start by telling us your name, then what play (or movie, or TV show) your monologue is from.

    • Example: “Hello, my name is Alec Bowling and I’ll be performing a monologue from Seminar by Theresa Rebeck.”

  • Then you will perform your monologue.

  • After your performance, the directors may ask questions, or give notes; or there might be nothing further required.

HOW TO PREPARE FOR A TURPIN THEATRE AUDITION

How to Prepare

AUDITIONING FOR A PLAY

  • Comedy

    • If you’re auditioning for a comedic play, you’ll need to memorize one comedic monologue, somewhere between 1-2 minutes in length.

  • Drama

    • If you’re auditioning for a dramatic play, you’ll need to memorize one dramatic monologue, somewhere between 1-2 minutes in length.

 

AUDITIONING FOR A MUSICAL

  • Comedy

    • If you’re auditioning for a comedic musical, you’ll need to prepare two things:

      • Memorize one comedic monologue, somewhere between 1-2 minutes in length.

      • Prepare one song from a comedic musical, somewhere between 16-32 bars in length.

  • Drama

    • If you’re auditioning for a dramatic musical, you’ll need to prepare two things:

      • Memorize one dramatic monologue, somewhere between 1-2 minutes in length.

      • Prepare one song from a dramatic musical, somewhere between 16-32 bars in length.

 

NOTES

  • If your monologue is shorter than 1 minute, it’s not the end of the world; it’s not an "automatic disqualification," or anything like that. But, less time on stage does equal less time for you to showcase your talent. (NOTE: This is not permission to do a five-minute monologue).

  • Contemporary vs. Classical

    • There are two types of shows: Classical and Contemporary. Classical shows are any shows written before 1900. Contemporary shows are written after 1900. If auditioning for a contemporary show, you want to prepare a contemporary monologue. If classical, a classical monologue. For example, you don’t want to do a Shakespearean monologue for a contemporary show.

  • If you’re unsure what genre this year’s shows are, they are as follows:

    • Clue — contemporary comedic play

    • Our Town — contemporary dramatic play

    • Matilda — contemporary comedic musical

  • Once you choose your monologue, research the show that the monologue is from. Read it, if you have time (at least the synopsis). This will be invaluable in preparing for the audition. If you understand the show, you can better understand the character, and why they are saying the things they’re saying in this monologue. If you don’t understand the context, it’ll be like riding a bike without anyone to show you how. You might be able to figure it out, but it’ll take a lot more energy and you probably won’t do it quite right.

HOW TO FIND & PREPARE AN AUDITION MONOLOGUE

Monologue 1

STEP 1: COMEDY OR DRAMA?

  • If you’re auditioning for a comedy, you want to pick a comedic monologue; a dramatic monologue for a drama.

 

STEP 2: WHAT CHARACTER DO I WANT TO PLAY?

  • If there’s a specific role in the show you want to be considered for, try finding a monologue that will highlight why you might be a good fit for the part. If there’s no specific part you’re interested in, that’s okay, just look for something you think is a good fit for you, or interests you.

STEP 3: SEARCH

  • Google is your best friend. Just start by Googling: “dramatic monologues for men,” or “comedic monologues for women.” You will likely have to sift through a number of websites before you find the right one, but that is part of the process.

PRO-TIP

  • Don’t agonize about finding the One Perfect MonologueTM. You will likely find several monologues that are a good fit and will showcase your talent. Plus, the work you do to prepare the monologue of your choice is more important than the monologue itself.

STEP 4: MEMORIZE & PRACTICE

  • TBD

MONOLOGUE RESOURCES

Monologue 2

These links are by no means exhaustive. They can help, but in terms of monologues that are available to you, these are just the tip of the iceberg. We would encourage you to do your own research (Googling, etc.), and see what other monologues you can find. Unfortunately, there isn’t one single website that houses every single monologue ever written (but it’d be awesome if there was). The links below have great options, but you are not required to use them.

RESUMES

These links include resources to create resumes for theatre work. They include both performance resumes, technical resumes, stage management resumes, and other styles and approaches.

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